Alexander the Great

Lights! Camera! Edison!

Edison

Creativity AND Business Skills – We just completed a unit on Thomas Edison and his brainy brilliance that brought the world incandescent light bulbs, phonographs, movie cameras, etc.  The DK Readers book we read is entitled, “Thomas Edison: The Great Inventor”, but the underlying message is “Inventor? Yes, but this man ALSO possessed extraordinary business skills that were more than a match for his relentless inventing”.  Wow.  My son and I had as many conversations about Edison’s unerring business sense as we did about his creations.

drake better

Good books about bad people – so far we have learned about Napoleon, King George III, Rasputin, and Alexander the Great via the outstanding Scholastic “A Wicked History” series.  The books are well researched and written to our level of comprehension, meaning NOT juvenile, but not mind-numbingly erudite.  The only negative: the photos are always so small, in grey tones/very hard to decipher.  We are currently learning about a really awful person (from a really awful family chock full of bullies, thugs and thieves), Sir Francis Drake.  I had NO idea he was so reprehensible.  AWFUL.

Greetings book

“Greetings from Nowhere” – our new novel, by Barbara O’Connor is an original, entertaining book, just the type we look for (young adult themes my son can understand without the awkward “coming of age” element), with lots of concepts for us to discuss: motel, kitchenette, adoption, and for heavens sakes, last night we had to Google Image CHARM BRACELETS.

hands

Art at the Vatican – to prepare ourselves for a Vatican art survey, we are reading “Michelangelo” by Diane Stanley. Excellent resource.

Dogs playing poker

Art at Le Fictitious Local Diner – this story problem revolves around the diner gussying up the place with selected pieces of what some might call art. Of course, they are installing the classic “A Friend in Need” (the rest of us know it as “Dogs Playing Poker”) by Cassius Marcellus Coolidge, purchased for $45.  A portrait of Elvis on black velvet has also been purchased for $90.  Posters of Batman, Superman, and Marilyn Monroe round out the collection, the lot acquired at a garage sale for $10.  How much has the diner spent on “artwork”? (Heh, heh, the answer is not “zero”.)  Money to purchase the exciting wall decor came from the diner’s tabletop jukeboxes.  At 25 cents per song, how many songs had to be played before the art could be purchased?

Inventions for Inventions: our classical music theme last night – we celebrated the inventions of Thomas Edison by listening to a few inventions by Johann Sebastian Bach.  First, we needed to understand what a Bach invention is.  For this, we viewed a superb 7-minute video starring killer pianist Simone Dinnerstein.  This video is a jewel!  Just watch her flying fingers!

Bach’s 15 inventions were composed as keyboard exercises in 1723.  We listened to:

  • Invention No. 8 in F major”, played by Simone Dinnerstein.  Seriously, we love her!  We want to know where to get our SD Fan Club badges.

  • Invention No. 13 in A minor”, played by little mighty mite, Annie Zhou, an 8 year old, competing in the Canadian Music Competition a few years back.  Watch her attack this piece.

  • Invention No. 6 in E major” played by a banjo and double bass.  We watched this for comic relief, but were so pleasantly surprised by the high quality of the performance! Kudos!

Welcome to the best part of my day!

– Jane BH

Brainiac!

chipotle cup

The Cup O’ Knowledge – Thank you Chipotle!  We love your “Cultivating Thought” author series (short essays on all sorts of interesting stuff printed up on the side of the Chipotle cups)!  This week, my son and I spent the necessary two minutes reading from the latest Chipotle cup about Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity.  Just so A+.  This motivated us to read through “On a Beam of Light” (also about Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity) by Jennifer Berne/illustrated by Vladimir Radunsky (just enough information for us non-physicist types, supported by dear, wispy illustrations that capture Einstein perfectly).

Alexander the Great – we finished our short study of Alexander the Great and came away with a few more vocab words: monsoon and mutiny.  MONSOON!  Rain, rain, rain, rain, rain.  MUTINY!  We thought about how a leader (like Alexander) could probably forget about being remembered as “beloved” if his soldiers felt compelled to stage a mutiny.

white rose

Farmer Brown Question – (here’s an abrupt change of mood):  Farmer Brown is in the white rose business! He sells LOTS of white roses for DIY wedding bouquets.  A nice bouquet uses a dozen roses, and Farmer Brown sells a “bouquet package” – the roses AND a “How to Fashion the Bridal Bouquet of your Dreams!” DVD for $40.   If he took in $240 this past month, how many weddings were enhanced with Farmer Brown’s roses?  Farmer Brown ALSO makes a “boutonniere package” for $10. If half of the “bouquet package” purchasers also bought a “boutonniere package”, how much more did Farmer Brown make on his white rose endeavor last month?

einstein violin

Music Focus – Einstein and his violin!  Back to Albert Einstein – we learned that Einstein played the violin with great skill, he said that helped him think better, and declared, “The most joy in my life has come to me from my violin.”   We learned that he preferred the compositions of Mozart, considering the violin serenades superior to the violin concertos.  We want to like what Einstein liked, so we listened to:

  • “Mozart’s Violin Serenade No. 6”, the “Serenade Notturna”, movement 4 (the rondo), composed in 1776.  Only about 3 minutes in length.

  • “Mozart’s Violin Serenade No. 13”, the super famous “Eine Kleine Nachtmusik”, movement 4 (the rondo – again!), composed in 1787.  About 4 minutes in length.

  • Finally! Look what we found! “Mozart’s Violin Sonata No. 26, in B-flat major” (composed in 1779), with an actual audio recording of Albert Einstein playing the violin!  My son really enjoyed the privilege of listening to this music, and viewing the accompanying photographs.

Welcome to the best part of my day!

– Jane BH

That’s Gotta Hurt

pike manpike manpike manpike man

The Macedonian Pike – my son and I are now studying Alexander the Great, who spent his short life (for thousands upon thousands of people, a life not short enough) as a most capable warmonger.  Home base was Macedonia (perched right atop Greece) (found it on the globe), where his Macedonian soldiers were totally whipped into shape and marched with 15-foot tall pikes.  YIKES (there is a sharp metal knife at the end of each pole).  LOADS of warmonger vocabulary words: phalanx, chariot, catapult, mercenary, infantry, cavalry.

alexander the great

Shakespeare this past week – we finished up the comedy, “Much Ado about Nothing” and we have just started the history, “Julius Caesar”.

peck novels

Reading for fun – to balance the war and intrigue study, we need novels that make us laugh.  We LOVED “A Long Way from Chicago” by Richard Peck. LOVED IT.  Every single chapter had an hilarious twist that had us marveling. This book WILL be re-read.  We are following “A Long Way from Chicago” with its sequel, “A Year Down Yonder”.  So far, it is a lot of fun (and it is a Newbery Award Winner), but for us,  probably isn’t in line for a re-read.  But maybe it will be!  Hope springs eternal.

pencil grip

We write – My daughter directed us toward “The Pencil Grip Writing Claw”, and I found a pack of six on Amazon – can’t remember the price, but very cheap.  My son has been practicing writing with this for the past week, and is getting comfortable using this little rubbery appliance on his fingertips.  It truly makes one grasp a writing utensil correctly.

Our Farmer Brown Story Problem of the week – Farmer Brown has 15 field hands who needed new summer hats to keep the blazing sun off their faces.  He purchased a dozen straw cowboy hats for $360 and a dozen canvas “outback” style hats for $300.  Ten of the field hands wanted cowboy hats and the others chose outback hats. Farmer Brown donated the remaining hats to a local farming extension office because they are always so short on funds. How much was his donation worth?

One of the music themes from last week: “Melodies from Exotic Lands” –

  • “Scheherazade” by Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov, movement I, composed in 1888.  Based upon “The Arabian Nights”, SO elegant.

  • Overture from “Abduction from the Seraglio” by Mozart, composed in 1782.  Two words:  Turkish harem!  What’s not to like, and in this short overture we CANNOT get enough of the smashing symbols.

  • “Arrival of the Queen of Sheba” by Handel, composed in 1748, as part of his oratorio, “Solomon”.   We sort of chuckle every time we hear it, because the music seems more evocative of an arrival at Kensington Palace in the 18th century than the Queen of Sheba’s arrival in Jerusalem during Old Testament times.

Welcome to the best part of my day!

– Jane BH